History of the Kamikaze of Project Focke-Wulf

During a brief moment in the history of World War II (1939-1945), some members of the German hierarchy faced the prospect of a suicide kamikaze attack on strategic Allied targets. This idea was further reinforced as Germany began to lose positions in the Allied offensive and reduced its air initiative due to relentless Allied bombardment day and night.

Combined with despair over the Japanese's successful use of suicide bombings on Allied naval targets, the idea of ??German suicide fighters deserved serious consideration.

In January 1944, members of the German Academy of Aeronautics jointly studied the possibility of such a weapon and agreed that they should urge the Luftwaffe to support such an attack. The sacrifice of a lone German pilot's life in action was seen as a very effective measure of disruption to the Allied forces - some in the German leadership wanted to demand a favorable surrender at this point in the war.

If a bridge, depot or fuel depot could be destroyed at the expense of aircraft and their pilots, while preventing a handful of bombers from getting proper supplies, the German kamikaze concept was considered feasible. However, the idea of ??self-sacrifice for the common good is not a fundamental idea in Western thought, as in places like Japan where honor and loyalty to the emperor are above all else.

Giving up one's own life in this way requires a pilot with a certain amount of courage.

The six engines will be Daimler-Benz DB 603N type, 12-cylinder development, each producing 1,900 hp. The engine was already shared by various other German fighter jets in the conflict, including Focke-Wulf's own Ta 152 high-altitude fighter, so it proved to be a proven asset.

Performance estimates for the Fw Kamikaze Carrier include a top speed of 348 mph - certainly not fast enough to avoid an intercept, but this was offset to some extent when changing tactics to avoid hitting the carrier with a jet (Ar 234B), including two miles target area. The kamikaze fighters have now been released, they have promised to escort their jets with them, and airlines are now free to return home to resupply.

From the looks of it, this large aircraft could not only be used to support kamikaze raids, it could also easily act as a heavy transport when serving front-line troops. Its high-wing design will also encourage short landings, and its landing gear can land on rough surfaces.

Portability will be a key quality of the series.

As expected, the German kamikaze program failed at the end of the war. All the intended design goals of the project were undoubtedly successful, and the wartime situation in Germany has only derailed the development of many aircraft over the past few weeks.

The concept was never fully reliable or tested, and nothing worked beyond the drawing board until it was over. The idea that the German pilot could even survive the rescue was a recurring problem, and the materials needed to make this expensive project a success were few and far between.

This makes Focke-Wulf's "Kamikaze" just one of many German wartime "paper airplane" projects that simply weren't supposed to be.

Focke-Wulf Project Kamikaze Launcher Specification

Basic

Year:
1944
Staff:
2

Production

[0 units]:
Focke-Wulf - Nazi Germany

Roles

- X-Plane / Development

Dimensions

Length:

114. 83 feet (35 m)

Width:

177. 17 feet (54 m)

Height:

39.37 ft (12 m)

Weight

Curb Weight:

113,097 lbs (51,300 kg)

MTOW:

268,964 lb (122,000 kg)

(difference: +155,867 pt)

Performance

6 x Daimler-Benz DB 603N 12-cylinder piston engines, 1,900 hp each.

Performance

Maximum Speed:

348 mph (560 kph; 302 kts)

Service Ceiling:

27,887 feet (8,500 m; 5. 28 miles)

Maximum Range:

1,069 miles (1,720 km; 929 nm)

Rate-of-Climb:

1,500 ft/min (457 m/min)

ARMAMENT

None. Payload of one or several "kamikaze" suicide aircraft. Local defense supplied by accompanying escort aircraft.

VARIANTS

"Kamikaze Carrier" - Base Project Name.

Related stuff

1400 1514 1587 1765 1774 1775 1776 1782 1785 1786 1791 1797 1811 1813 1819 1840 1841 1842 1852 1853 1855 1856 1857 1859 1860 1861 1862 1863 1864 1865 1866 1867 1868 1869 1870 1873 1874 1875 1877 1878 1885 1886 1888 1889 1895 1896 1897 1898 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Contact  |  Privacy Policy