BS-3 (Model 1944) History

Field guns have long been an integral part of any successful ground force. Napoleon achieved excellent results with his plays when writing the history of Europe in the 19th century. By the early 20th century, field guns had become the core of the armies of the world's major powers.

Although the tank arrived in World War I, it was still widely used and played an increasing role in offensive operations during World War II.

Artillery made up a large part of the Red Army forces during World War II. In September 1939, Germany invaded neighboring Poland, officially beginning World War II. A few weeks later, through a loose alliance, they were joined by the Soviet Union as Poland was desperately divided in two by the conquered.

Germany's attention then turned to Norway, the Netherlands, and finally France, while the Soviet leaders focused their attention on Finland. The alliance lasted until June 1941, when German forces, after a failed attempt to capture Britain, turned their fire to the heart of the Soviet Empire and began Operation Barbarossa on the Eastern Front.

With supply lines congested and the arrival of winter in Russia, Germany is advancing at an incredible pace, just a few kilometers from the capital Moscow.

With the rebuilding of the Legion and national zeal, the Soviet response was brutal and swift, sending the Eastern Front into a series of dramatic and historic battles that drove the Germans and their allies back to the west. During the reaction, the Soviets used various weapons.

Throughout the conflict, more and more powerful designs emerged in the form of tanks, planes, and artillery. One of the latter became the Model 1944 (M1944) 100mm Field Gun (also known as the BS-3).

The type was used as a simple field gun for artillery support, and as a direct-fire anti-tank weapon once it was found to perform well in both roles.

By 1944, German tank armor had evolved from the configuration of the original Panzer I and II light tank series to the Panzer III and IV medium tank series. It was followed by the Panther V medium tank and the Tiger I and Tiger II heavy tanks, and better penetrating weapon systems were needed to fight these steely beasts.

While the Soviet 76.2mm gun proved to be one of the best 76mm guns of the war, increasing the caliber was the Soviet way.

The M1944 originated from the B-34, a powerful naval gun designed for the rigors of life at sea. This provided an excellent pedigree for the transition to land-based deployment and an equally excellent projectile system for the Red Army's artillery formations. The conversion was led by V.G.

Grabin (1900-1980), who was also responsible for the production of the 76.2mm ZiS-3 series field guns for the Soviet Army - 103,000 of these guns were produced at the end of their history. As such, the M1944 brings an excellent base for a durable, robust and reliable field gun.

The M1944 was soon assigned to the Red Army Artillery Brigade along with the ZiS-3.

BS-3 (Type 1944) Specification

BASIC

Year of Service

1944

Origins

Soviet Union

Status

Active.

Limited service.

Crew

6

Production

6,500

Manufacturer

State Armory - USSR

Operator

Bulgaria; China; East Germany; Egypt; Hungary; Mongolia; North Korea; Poland; Romania; Somalia; former Soviet Union; Syria; Vietnam

ROLLING

Fire Support/Attack/Breakthrough

Support allied forces with direct/indirect fire, attacking forward positions and/or breaking through fortified areas of the battlefield.

Dimensions and Weight

Length

30.7 feet

9.37m

width

7. 0 feet

2.13m

Height

4.9 feet

1.5m

Weight

8,047 lbs

3,650 kg

Tonnage

4.0 tons

Power and Performance

Engine:

No. This is a towed gun.

Area

13.0 km

(21.0 km)

Weapons

1 x 100 mm main barrel/barrel.

AMMUNITION

Dependent upon ammunition carrier / resupply.

VARIANTS

BS-3 - Base Series Designation. Model 1944 (M1944) - Alternative Designation. Type 59-1 - Chinese military designation.

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